July 16, 2008

Caruso at Large

Went to the Grove last night—the Grave, my friends call it—in search of an iPhone, and found that the consumer-spending crisis seems to be leaving this former stand of orange trees alone. (The Grove, an underage Las Vegas, is said to have exceeded Disneyland in annual visitors.) The crowd in front of the Apple Store was too large to contemplate joining, had it even been allowed. “The line is closed,” an employee with an angel wing tattooed on each forearm said.

Rick Caruso, the developer of the Grove and a rumored candidate in next year’s mayoral election, opened a new project in Glendale this spring—the unparseably named Americana at Brand—and is working on another mise en scène for the parking lots next to the Santa Anita Race Track. The Shops at Santa Anita are scheduled to open in two years.

Caruso was in the paper again yesterday, in a story about his plans to renovate the old Miramar Hotel in Montecito. Caruso’s plans have met with some local resistance and the Montecito Planning Commission will hold a hearing on the project tomorrow. Meanwhile, Caruso’s m.o. in winning over Montecito residents might provide a clue to his intentions. From the L.A. Times:

“He’s like a good politician who goes out and walks the neighborhoods and kisses the babies,” said Montecito filmmaker Steve Traxler. “He knows what to do, and he does it the right way.”

April 3, 2008

Testing Blockquote Code

This is a blockquote how we've been doing them—no p tags, new code for each line:

What if, for once, we did not credit Richard Price with having a “wonderful ear for dialogue”? What if we praised his wonderful mind for dialogue instead? An “ear” for dialogue always seems to imply reportorial or stenographic prowess, the writer sitting in a bar or a bus, studiously agog for the modern mot. Henry Green, the author of perhaps the greatest English novel of dialogue, “Loving,” a book written almost entirely in the speech of Cockney servants, insisted that his job was to create, “in the mind of the reader, life which is not, and which is non-representational.”
And, indeed, one would have to get very drunk or ride on a magic bus to hear the kinds of anarchic metaphor, wild figuration, mashed slang, and frequent poetry that Richard Price creates on the page. Some parts of society may speak more pungently than others, but our usual conversation is closer to Charles Bovary’s than we might like—a sidewalk on which everyone else’s opinions and phrases have walked. Actual speech tends to be dribblingly repetitive, and relatively nonfigurative, nonpictorial. Price, by contrast, awards his characters great figurative powers, endows them with an ability to take everyone’s clichés and customize them into something gleaming and fresh. His new novel, “Lush Life” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux; $26), which is filled with page after page of vital speech, shows him inventing a life for dialogue rather than just taking it from life; and this spoken magic is often indistinguishable from Price’s apparently more formal, descriptive prose.

And this is a blockquote how TypePad builds them:

What if, for once, we did not credit Richard Price with having a “wonderful ear for dialogue”? What if we praised his wonderful mind for dialogue instead? An “ear” for dialogue always seems to imply reportorial or stenographic prowess, the writer sitting in a bar or a bus, studiously agog for the modern mot. Henry Green, the author of perhaps the greatest English novel of dialogue, “Loving,” a book written almost entirely in the speech of Cockney servants, insisted that his job was to create, “in the mind of the reader, life which is not, and which is non-representational.”

And, indeed, one would have to get very drunk or ride on a magic bus to hear the kinds of anarchic metaphor, wild figuration, mashed slang, and frequent poetry that Richard Price creates on the page. Some parts of society may speak more pungently than others, but our usual conversation is closer to Charles Bovary’s than we might like—a sidewalk on which everyone else’s opinions and phrases have walked. Actual speech tends to be dribblingly repetitive, and relatively nonfigurative, nonpictorial. Price, by contrast, awards his characters great figurative powers, endows them with an ability to take everyone’s clichés and customize them into something gleaming and fresh. His new novel, “Lush Life” (Farrar, Straus & Giroux; $26), which is filled with page after page of vital speech, shows him inventing a life for dialogue rather than just taking it from life; and this spoken magic is often indistinguishable from Price’s apparently more formal, descriptive prose.

September 21, 2007

testing extended post

does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??does this work??

Hmm... post continuation here....

June 26, 2007

testing curly quotes

Testing to “see if ’ 145 and 146 work plus “ 147 and ”

’ “ ” ” “

May 16, 2007

Boom2 - guest blogger test


May 16, 2007

boom

Sweet, an audio embed.

March 27, 2007

Image Test

Ninjababy Binary_grid